Archive for September, 2013

Nicholas Skaggs

Autopilot Sandboxing

Autopilot has continued to change with the times, and the pending release of 1.4 brings even more goodies; including some performance fixes. But today I wanted to cover a newly landed feature from the minds of Martin and Jean-Baptiste (thanks guys!).

If you've developed autopilot tests in the past you will have noticed how cumbersome it can be to run the tests. If you run a test on your desktop, you lose control of your mouse and keyboard for the duration, and you might even accidentally cause a test to fail. This can be especially noticeable when you are iterating over getting your test to run "just right" while wanting to keep your introspection tree in vis open, or reviewing someone else's code while wanting to verify the tests run. Enter sandbox mode.

A new command called autopilot-sandbox-run lets you easily run a testsuite inside your choice of two sandboxes; Xvfb by default, or if you want to visually see the output, Xephyr. Have a quick look at the command options below as of this writing:

Usage: autopilot-sandbox-run [OPTIONS...] TEST [TEST...]
Runs autopilot tests in a 'fake' Xserver with Xvfb or Xephyr. autopilot runs
in Xvfb by default.
   
    TEST: autopilot tests to run

Options:
    -h, --help           This help
    -d, --debug          Enable debug mode
    -a, --autopilot ARG  Pass arguments ARG to 'autopilot run'
    -X, --xephyr         Run in nested mode with Xephyr
    -s, --screen WxHxD   Sets screen width, height, and depth to W, H, and D respectively (default: 1024x768x24)


The next time you want to get your hands dirty with some autopilot tests, try out the sandbox. I'm sure you'll find a very nice use for it in your workflow; after all wouldn't it be handy to run multiple testsuites at once?
Nicholas Skaggs

Testing Ubuntu Touch: The final month before release

As of today, we are exactly one month away from the release of Saucy Salamander. As part of that release, ubuntu is committed to delivering an image of ubuntu-touch, ready to install on supported devices.

And while folks have been dogfooding the images since May, many changes have continued to land as the images mature. As such, the qa team is committing to test each of the stable images released, and do exploratory testing against new features and specific packagesets.

If you have a device, I would encourage you to join this effort! Everything you need to know can be found upon this wiki page. You'll need a nexus device and a little time to spend with the latest image. If you find a bug, report it! The wiki has links to help. Testing doesn't get anymore fun than this; flash your phone and try to break it! Go wild!

And if you don't own a device? You can still help! As bugs are found and fixed, the second part of the process is to create automated tests for them so they don't occur again. Any bug you see on the list is a potential candidate, but we'll be marking those we especially think would be useful to write an autopilot tests for with a " touch-needs-autopilot" tag.

Join us in testing, confirming bugs, or testwriting autopilot tests. We want the ubuntu touch images to be the best they can be in 1 month's time. Happy Testing!
Nicholas Skaggs

Testing Ubuntu Touch: The final month before release

As of today, we are exactly one month away from the release of Saucy Salamander. As part of that release, ubuntu is committed to delivering an image of ubuntu-touch, ready to install on supported devices.

And while folks have been dogfooding the images since May, many changes have continued to land as the images mature. As such, the qa team is committing to test each of the stable images released, and do exploratory testing against new features and specific packagesets.

If you have a device, I would encourage you to join this effort! Everything you need to know can be found upon this wiki page. You'll need a nexus device and a little time to spend with the latest image. If you find a bug, report it! The wiki has links to help. Testing doesn't get anymore fun than this; flash your phone and try to break it! Go wild!

And if you don't own a device? You can still help! As bugs are found and fixed, the second part of the process is to create automated tests for them so they don't occur again. Any bug you see on the list is a potential candidate, but we'll be marking those we especially think would be useful to write an autopilot tests for with a " touch-needs-autopilot" tag.

Join us in testing, confirming bugs, or testwriting autopilot tests. We want the ubuntu touch images to be the best they can be in 1 month's time. Happy Testing!
David Murphy (schwuk)

Playing with Coder (on Ubuntu)

Nicholas Skaggs

Jamming Quality Style

It's that time of year again! Time to get your jam on (I like mine on a bagel).
  

While you are making plans for Ubuntu Global Jam, don't forget you can contribute to quality as well. There's a separate subpage of the global jam wiki dedicated to it.

We love new test contributions, and there's a collection of wiki tutorials and videos to help you contribute them. You don't have to be technical to write tests -- we need manual testcases also which are written in plain English :-)

More interested in submitting your results for tests? We've also got you covered. We have tests for the default applications of ubuntu as well as the images of ubuntu. Download an image and run it on your machine. Try running through some default testcases for ubuntu or your favorite flavor. An image and a pc or laptop is all you need to get started. Happy Jamming!