Archive for June, 2013

Nicholas Skaggs

An autopilot emulator for ubuntu sdk apps

A couple weeks ago we announced the initiative to drive up our autopilot (that is, automated) tests for our ubuntu touch core apps. The core apps are being made with the ubuntu sdk, and thus share the same language (QML) and toolkit (ubuntusdk).

With this in mind I wanted to provide an emulator, which in autopilot speak, is a utility class for writing autopilot tests that use the ubuntu SDK. The goal is to help accelerate the process for getting the testcases written, as well as standardizing best practices for testing common features. At the moment the emulator contains useful functions like tab switching, selecting from popovers, opening and closing the toolbar and clicking toolbar buttons. Please, take a look and utilize the emulator when you are contributing new tests for the ubuntu touch applications. For the moment, the emulator can be found here:

lp:~nskaggs/+junk/ubuntusdk_autopilot_emulator

The future home is hopefully in the SDK itself, but for now consider that branch your source for emulator goodness. Now, a quick FAQ.

Is it ready for use?
Yes, it's ready and tested on several core apps now including clock, calendar, terminal, and file manager. That said if you find an issue, simply contact me or propose an improvement!

How do I use it?
Inside your autopilot test subfolder, add an emulators folder if it's not already present. Next, branch my source above -- it will add ubuntusdk.py to the folder. Simply incorporate it into your __init__.py or testcase itself and call the utility functions with ubuntusdk.*. For an example check out the ubuntu-terminal-app and the merge request from today. It shows adding autopilot tests to an empty branch. In addition, the emulator (albeit an earlier version) was used in the tutorial on the ubuntu app developer portal.

Will it be updated?
Yes! Expect refinements and tweaks as we go along. Hopefully a true "stable and complete" version will appear in the not too distant feature when the emulator itself has a proper home. In the meantime, use it and as more complex tests are added, expect to update the emulator in the source branch you are working in.

Go forth and write tests!
Nicholas Skaggs

An autopilot emulator for ubuntu sdk apps

A couple weeks ago we announced the initiative to drive up our autopilot (that is, automated) tests for our ubuntu touch core apps. The core apps are being made with the ubuntu sdk, and thus share the same language (QML) and toolkit (ubuntusdk).

With this in mind I wanted to provide an emulator, which in autopilot speak, is a utility class for writing autopilot tests that use the ubuntu SDK. The goal is to help accelerate the process for getting the testcases written, as well as standardizing best practices for testing common features. At the moment the emulator contains useful functions like tab switching, selecting from popovers, opening and closing the toolbar and clicking toolbar buttons. Please, take a look and utilize the emulator when your contributing new tests for the ubuntu touch applications. For the moment, the emulator can be found here:

lp:~nskaggs/+junk/ubuntusdk_autopilot_emulator

The future home is hopefully in the SDK itself, but for now consider that branch your source for emulator goodness. Now, a quick FAQ.

Is it ready for use?
Yes, it's ready and tested on several core apps now including clock, calendar, terminal, and file manager. That said if you find an issue, simply contact me or propose an improvement!

How do I use it?
Inside your autopilot test subfolder, add an emulators folder if it's not already present. Next, branch my source above -- it will add ubuntusdk.py to the folder. Simply incorporate it into your __init__.py or testcase itself and call the utility functions with ubuntusdk.*. For an example check out the ubuntu-terminal-app and the merge request from today. It shows adding autopilot tests to an empty branch. In addition, the emulator (albeit an earlier version) was used in the tutorial on the ubuntu app developer portal.

Will it be updated?
Yes! Expect refinements and tweaks as we go along. Hopefully a true "stable and complete" version will appear in the not too distant feature when the emulator itself has a proper home. In the meantime, use it and as more complex tests are added, expect to update the emulator in the source branch your working in.

Go forth and write tests!
Nicholas Skaggs

QATracker Survey + bonus mockup

Hot on the heels of our first cadence week, I wanted to take the opportunity to collect feedback about the tools we as a community utilize. Specifically the QATracker which we heavily rely on for managing our work, testcases and results. From the wiki, "The QATracker is the master repository for all our our testing within ubuntu QA. It holds our testcases, records our results, and helps coordinate our testing events."

This is a link to a brief survey asking a few simple questions about how you've used the tool. All your responses are anonymous, but I will publish the aggregate question information and share it with the community once completed. The goal is to help ensure the tool is meeting our needs and is being utilized.

I'll leave the survey up until June 24th. My hope is to encourage more folks to help test as well as make it more enjoyable for those already taking part. I want to ensure our tools and processes continue to evolve, strengthen and become more robust for everyone as we continue on our mission. Part of that is making sure the tools we use are enjoyable!

Thanks in advance everyone!

As a bonus, Pasi, aka knome, has put together some mockups on how we might be able to switch what the results page looks like. This is perhaps the most utilized page of the site, so without further ado, here's a mockup of some changes proposed to make it more usable:

Old Site
New Site Mockup

What a change eh? The add test results has been moved to the sidebar and simplified, the bugs listing has been written out, and the results have been moved to the top. Finally the links have also been moved to the sidebar and Pasi has updated the icons ;-)

SO, what does everyone think about the changes? Many thanks to Pasi for putting this together! Leave a comment, a message on the mailing list, or reflect your thoughts in the survey.
Nicholas Skaggs

Feeling Saucy? Help us Test the new release!

Join the ubuntu quality community team's effort this week! As a community we test different things about every ~2 weeks in ubuntu, and share the results to flesh out bugs and problem areas.

So what's up for testing this week? The daily images, the default applications in ubuntu and a new version of the sound stack for testing.

Ready to help? Full details are here.

Need some help on how to contribute? Have a look at this page and the walkthroughs listed. Of particular interest is the ISO testing and Cadence Week testing walkthroughs.

Do note that you don't need anything special to participate in cadence week testing! Both an installed version of the development branch of ubuntu (aka saucy) in a VM or on a real box, or even a live session of the latest daily image will work. For more information on how to use a live session to test, check out the Cadence Week testing walkthrough or watch the youtube video of the same.
Happy Testing!
Nicholas Skaggs

Autopilot Tests for Ubuntu Touch Core Apps

A few months ago the ubuntu touch core apps project was launched. For those of you following along with Michael's regular updates have gotten to see these applications grow up rather quickly.
Autopilot Says: How can I help?
Now it's time to add some more testing around these applications as they have reached a basic functional level of usability. Automated testing via autopilot to the rescue!

To help kickstart this process we've put together a recipe for writing autopilot tests specific to QML applications and added it to developer.ubuntu.com. In addition, we'll be hosting a hackfest next week on June 13th to help add basic autopilot testcases for each of the core apps. Folks will be on-hand ready to field your questions and hack together on the autopilot testcases needed for the applications. Join us and help support the wonderful community of application developers making awesome applications for ubuntu!

So how can you help? 
  1. First, go read through the recipe on writing autopilot tests for QML applications. It's also a good idea to have a look through the official tutorial for autopilot and bookmark the API reference link so it's handy.
  2. Armed with your new knowledge, start hacking on some autopilot tests for the core apps. Here's a list of core applications along with the status of autopilot tests. Choose something that looks interesting to you and add some tests.
  3. Follow the contributing guide to help you get your work contributed into the ubuntu touch core application project you chose.
  4. Finally come out to the hackfest! It's your chance to share your work, ask questions, get your tests sorted and merged and socialize and meet other members of the community.
  5. Don't forget there is a wonderful quality community you can be a part of and get help from if you get stuck! There's a mailing list for ubuntu-touch, and ubuntu-quality as well as IRC channels #ubuntu-touch, #ubuntu-autopilot and #ubuntu-quality. Use these resources to help you!
See you next week and happy testing!