Archive for October, 2012

Nicholas Skaggs

Community Charity-a-thon: The Aftermath

I wanted to express my heartfelt thanks to everyone who contributed. To those who gave on behalf of the debian community, thank you as well! I stated that for every five donations I would do a manpage for a package that is missing one :-) I received just under 5 donations marked debian, but not to worry, I'll still create a manpage for one in need. Although I did other work during the marathon, I purposefully held onto creating the manpage until I was a bit more rested -- I have enough trouble speaking English sometimes without adding in sleep deprivation. The man page readers will thank me, and I'm sure those who get my page to review will as well.

To the rest of you, thank you very much. We raised $943.34 for WaterAid. That's amazing! I'm truly touched by your generosity. Here's the complete list of donors, hats off to all of you -- I know several of you donated anonymously, thank you!

Anonymous :-)
Cormac Wilcox
Gema

Anders Jonsson
Arthur Talpaert
Sam Hewitt
Alvaro

Ólavur Gaardlykke
Joey-Elijah Sneddon
steve burdine

Thomas Martin (tenach)
Daniel Marrable
sebsebseb Mageia
Jonas Grønås Drange
Gregor Herrmann
Mark Shuttleworth
phillw
Thijs K
Alvaro
Max Brustkern
Jane Silber
Gema Gomez-Solano
Martin Pitt
Michelle Hall


Now I know no one wants to re-watch that crazy 24 hours of video, but I wanted to bring you a few highlights as well. I spent time doing some of my normal work, but I also promised to do something outside the norm. I was able to scratch an itch, and although my on-air demo failed (an uh-duh moment), I was able to record this video immediately after demonstrating where we in QA are focusing next cycle. In addition, there were several talks from QA personnel, and I recommend watching this clip if your interested in hearing Rick's take on where ubuntu is going, and indeed how quality will play a role. You can skip to here if you only want to hear his take on quality. Now is a great time to be involved in QA -- I'm excited to see things unfold for 14.04, and I hope you are to.

For the readers who actually made it this far, I've got the best for last. There were some gags in those 24 hours; for instance, check out my chicken dance! (*cough* this was supposed to be a group thing *cough*). Ohh, and there's always this lovely screencap. To be fair, this was about 20 hours or so in.


Nicholas Skaggs

Community Charity-a-thon: The Aftermath

I wanted to express my heartfelt thanks to everyone who contributed. To those who gave on behalf of the debian community, thank you as well! I stated that for every five donations I would do a manpage for a package that is missing one :-) I received just under 5 donations marked debian, but not to worry, I'll still create a manpage for one in need. Although I did other work during the marathon, I purposefully held onto creating the manpage until I was a bit more rested -- I have enough trouble speaking English sometimes without adding in sleep deprivation. The man page readers will thank me, and I'm sure those who get my page to review will as well.

To the rest of you, thank you very much. We raised $943.34 for WaterAid. That's amazing! I'm truly touched by your generosity. Here's the complete list of donors, hats off to all of you -- I know several of you donated anonymously, thank you!

Anonymous :-)
Cormac Wilcox
Gema

Anders Jonsson
Arthur Talpaert
Sam Hewitt
Alvaro

Ólavur Gaardlykke
Joey-Elijah Sneddon
steve burdine

Thomas Martin (tenach)
Daniel Marrable
sebsebseb Mageia
Jonas Grønås Drange
Gregor Herrmann
Mark Shuttleworth
phillw
Thijs K
Alvaro
Max Brustkern
Jane Silber
Gema Gomez-Solano
Martin Pitt
Michelle Hall


Now I know no one wants to re-watch that crazy 24 hours of video, but I wanted to bring you a few highlights as well. I spent time doing some of my normal work, but I also promised to do something outside the norm. I was able to scratch an itch, and although my on-air demo failed (an uh-duh moment), I was able to record this video immediately after demonstrating where we in QA are focusing next cycle. In addition, there were several talks from QA personnel, and I recommend watching this clip if your interested in hearing Rick's take on where ubuntu is going, and indeed how quality will play a role. You can skip to here if you only want to hear his take on quality. Now is a great time to be involved in QA -- I'm excited to see things unfold for 14.04, and I hope you are to.

For the readers who actually made it this far, I've got the best for last. There were some gags in those 24 hours; for instance, check out my chicken dance! (*cough* this was supposed to be a group thing *cough*). Ohh, and there's always this lovely screencap. To be fair, this was about 20 hours or so in.


Nicholas Skaggs

Preparing for the Community Charity-a-thon

In preparation for the 24 hour marathon, I thought I would share with everyone my thoughts on my I chose my charity, and what I plan to do for 24 hours :-) To start off the post, let me get this right out front <insert flashing lights and whirlygigs> DONATE HERE </insert>

First the charity, WaterAid. I chose WaterAid upon realizing how important water is to me. I love water -- I love to stare out across a vast sea, or to sail along it using the wind, and hearing only the splashing of the waves, and the smell of life beneath it. And of course, I consume water each day in order to sustain life. I am happy to support an organization whose goal it is to provide sustainable water sources to everyone. Water is important to life, and is a basic need for us all as humans. We need clean water, and even moreso, we need sustainable access to it. Water is precious, and it's important for us to not pollute the water we have as well. WaterAid understands this need and works with locals to help create clean renewable water sources. Consider donating to help those who don't have access to the same resource we take for granted -- available anytime out of our faucet.

I'm also placing a call out to those who are interested in QA on both the Debian and ubuntu communities to participate. I plan to spend my time during the 24 hours doing something to further the work of how you interact with ubuntu and QA. So, to that end, I'd like to ask those of you who are interested in ubuntu to donate and install ubuntu during the marathon. I'll be here to provide technical installation support for you during the install. Let's see how many exotic configurations we can see successful installations on. Got a RAID setup or some exotic hardware? Multiple disks, partitions, and Os's? Get your systems backed up now, and let's try and install. NOTE, I'd encourage using the latest daily iso for installation, but you are welcome to also use beta2.

In addition for those of you in the Debian community, I am issuing a challenge for donations. For every 5 donations from the Debian community, I will write a missing man page from the list. I'll be focusing on things I use, but feel free to offer a suggestion during the marathon!

I would also issue a challenge to the greater ubuntu community. Do you have a problem that you are unable to solve within ubuntu? While I can't promise a fix for your issue, I will offer you my personal attention to help solve your problem. I'll help you file a bug, confirm it, or help you debug the problem to the best of my ability. I'll even offer my karma on askubuntu to your question ;-) If I get overwhelmed with donations, I'll pull the highest donators first -- but we do have 24 hours to fill! Note, I plan to do this work on Thursday, on-air, but you can donate in advance. Just leave me a note, or simply send me an email after your donation with your request if you donate in advance.

Finally, if none of the above suits you, I am happy to have a personal 1 on 1 match of highest level house of cards building, or another quick playing game of your choice on air. And don't worry, I'm ruthless competition, no pushover here!
Nicholas Skaggs

Preparing for the Community Charity-a-thon

In preparation for the 24 hour marathon, I thought I would share with everyone my thoughts on my I chose my charity, and what I plan to do for 24 hours :-) To start off the post, let me get this right out front <insert flashing lights and whirlygigs> DONATE HERE </insert>

First the charity, WaterAid. I chose WaterAid upon realizing how important water is to me. I love water -- I love to stare out across a vast sea, or to sail along it using the wind, and hearing only the splashing of the waves, and the smell of life beneath it. And of course, I consume water each day in order to sustain life. I am happy to support an organization whose goal it is to provide sustainable water sources to everyone. Water is important to life, and is a basic need for us all as humans. We need clean water, and even moreso, we need sustainable access to it. Water is precious, and it's important for us to not pollute the water we have as well. WaterAid understands this need and works with locals to help create clean renewable water sources. Consider donating to help those who don't have access to the same resource we take for granted -- available anytime out of our faucet.

I'm also placing a call out to those who are interested in QA on both the Debian and ubuntu communities to participate. I plan to spend my time during the 24 hours doing something to further the work of how you interact with ubuntu and QA. So, to that end, I'd like to ask those of you who are interested in ubuntu to donate and install ubuntu during the marathon. I'll be here to provide technical installation support for you during the install. Let's see how many exotic configurations we can see successful installations on. Got a RAID setup or some exotic hardware? Multiple disks, partitions, and Os's? Get your systems backed up now, and let's try and install. NOTE, I'd encourage using the latest daily iso for installation, but you are welcome to also use beta2.

In addition for those of you in the Debian community, I am issuing a challenge for donations. For every 5 donations from the Debian community, I will write a missing man page from the list. I'll be focusing on things I use, but feel free to offer a suggestion during the marathon!

I would also issue a challenge to the greater ubuntu community. Do you have a problem that you are unable to solve within ubuntu? While I can't promise a fix for your issue, I will offer you my personal attention to help solve your problem. I'll help you file a bug, confirm it, or help you debug the problem to the best of my ability. I'll even offer my karma on askubuntu to your question ;-) If I get overwhelmed with donations, I'll pull the highest donators first -- but we do have 24 hours to fill! Note, I plan to do this work on Thursday, on-air, but you can donate in advance. Just leave me a note, or simply send me an email after your donation with your request if you donate in advance.

Finally, if none of the above suits you, I am happy to have a personal 1 on 1 match of highest level house of cards building, or another quick playing game of your choice on air. And don't worry, I'm ruthless competition, no pushover here!
Jean-Baptiste

I was working on automating commit level building and testing of the gnome stack, and one of the painful and boring task is to setup the development and testing environment. Especially when you know that developers will have to use the same environment to reproduce failures found with testing and the QA Lab has restricted access.

So I went the Juju way and the result is a JHBuild charm .

This charm can be set up for manual use of JHBuild or automated building and testing. It is currently deployed in the Ubuntu QA Lab to build and test the gnome-core moduleset (197 modules) on Quantal.

Deploying JHBuild is as easy as configuring the service in config.yaml to your needs, bootstrapping juju and deploying jhbuild. Depending on the number of modules you want to build, you’ll need a medium or bigger instance type. Which consists in the following instructions:

1. Bootstrap the environment and deploy the service

$ juju bootstrap --constraints "instance-type=m1.medium"
$ juju deploy --config gnome.yaml \
 --repository $HOME/ubuntu/qa/juju/charms \
 local:jhbuild jhbuild

2. after installation, connect to the unit with:

$ juju ssh <unit_or_machine>

3. And run your first build

$ jhbuild build

4. You want to organize a hacking party ;)

$ juju add-unit jhbuild -n 10

6. To setup the service for automated build and publish the results:

$ juju set jhbuild autobuild=True publish=True

Results will be accessible on `http://<unit_public_addr>/`

Please see the README for more details and deployment instructions.

I hope it’ll be useful for you as well.