Archive for September, 2012

Nicholas Skaggs

Call for Testing: Unity 6.6 and Lenses

As you may have read about this week here or here unity is getting some late additions to it's feature set, with much of it landing in the form of new lenses. Here's what's landed in Unity 6.6:
  • Improved Window and workspace management
    • When switching between multiple application windows, the windows scale
  • The window decoration properly follows the selected theme
  • All launcher icons can be reordered
  • New shopping lens
  • Video lens enhancements
  • Improved lens previews
  • Improved home dash
In support of this late landing code, the Unity development team is asking for some extra testing on these specific features. To that end, I've updated the testcases for Unity, and posted the testcases specific to these changes for testing. Pay attention to the cases marked 'mandatory' and 'run-once'. These testcases contain the changes mentioned above, but it doesn't hurt to run through the optional cases if you have time. We don't like regressions either :-) By the time this post hits you, unity 6.6 should be landing in quantal, and you'll simply need to do a dist-upgrade -- instructions here. Here's a link to the testcases themselves:

Unity 6.6 Testing

Before I forget, here's a link to help you navigate the tracker, if you've never used it before: Guide on using the qatracker.

I'll keep the call for testing open through beta2 next week. If you participate in testing the beta2 images, consider also running through these testcases to make sure Unity is in good shape as well.

Thank you in advance for your help, and happy testing everyone!
Jean-Baptiste

A basic templating engine in bash

Nicholas Skaggs

Getting your bug fixed; the art of bug shepherding

We've all had this experience. Upgrade our hardware to the new version of ubuntu (or perhaps installing ubuntu for the first time on some new hardware), and everything works perfectly. We quickly dive in and enjoy the new experience of our favorite OS. Well, it's almost perfect. There's just this one bug that is bothering you.

Perhaps instead you are a tester. Someone who lives and breathes for breakage and the latest and greatest raw code packaged from the hands of it's developers. There's a new upgrade out and everything is perfect; well, except for that one bug.

So what do you do in these situations? Sadly some people may chose to do nothing but hope and wait. "Next cycle, or next release I'm hoping my bug will be fixed". Odds are, no one knows about your bug, and it can't be fixed if it's unknown. And if you are using proprietary software, "wait and see" is about the limit of your options. As a part of ubuntu however, we as a community can do so much more!

With that let me present my patented wizzbang approach to a successful resolution of your bug within ubuntu!
  
First, let me clarify what a successful resolution is. If you have been around ubuntu, you may have seen a bug that expired as 'incomplete'. This is clearly not a successful resolution. In my eyes, a successful resolution to a bug sees the status changed to a 'won't fix, fix committed, triaged, etc'.

Ok, so here's the steps:
  1. If you don’t know how to file a good bug, ask first! It's important to do your best to describe the problem you are experiencing, and if possible how to repeat the bug. Check out the post on askubuntu which has a nice summary of resources available to help you.
  2. File a good bug, using your newly formed knowledge from above :-)
  3. Get someone else to confirm it. This is important! If possible, have a friend confirm the bug on their system. Once they've confirmed it, have them mark the bug as affecting them as well on launchpad.
  4. Answer questions promptly when asked by others. Make sure you are getting emails from launchpad, and when someone asks a question on your bug, respond promptly.
  5. Get your bug triaged. If your bug is confirmed and filed correctly, the bug triagers should help triage the bug. If a long time has passed without this occurring, check to make sure you bug is in good order to be triaged. If so, asking politely for a triager to look at your bug on the #ubuntu-bugs channel is a good way to keep your bug moving.
  6. Help debug, test, and confirm and fixes that are made for your issue. If the developer spends time working on your bug, do what you can to help confirm it fixes your issue.
  7. Remember no one will care about your bug as much as you do! When you file a bug, commit to carrying it as far along in the process as you can.
That's it! There's no guarantee every bug you file now will receive your desired outcome, but you should see proper resolution, instead of your bugs expiring. By being a good participant you are ensuring you can feel good about the resolution of the bugs you file. Remember we are all human, and sometimes things get missed. Stick with your bug, and shepherd it through.

So is the process perfect? Not at all. We as a community still need to think more about improving our experience in dealing with problems. Not every "problem" encountered is a bug, and a process to better handle these problems is still worthy of thought. I invite those of you interested in this to look for a UDS session on the topic.

Special thanks to TheLordofTime and hggdh for their discussions surrounding bugs, and of course for our marvelous bugsquad without whom this would not be possible!

Nicholas Skaggs

Getting your bug fixed; the art of bug shepherding

We've all had this experience. Upgrade our hardware to the new version of ubuntu (or perhaps installing ubuntu for the first time on some new hardware), and everything works perfectly. We quickly dive in and enjoy the new experience of our favorite OS. Well, it's almost perfect. There's just this one bug that is bothering you.

Perhaps instead you are a tester. Someone who lives and breathes for breakage and the latest and greatest raw code packaged from the hands of it's developers. There's a new upgrade out and everything is perfect; well, except for that one bug.

So what do you do in these situations? Sadly some people may chose to do nothing but hope and wait. "Next cycle, or next release I'm hoping my bug will be fixed". Odds are, no one knows about your bug, and it can't be fixed if it's unknown. And if you are using proprietary software, "wait and see" is about the limit of your options. As a part of ubuntu however, we as a community can do so much more!

With that let me present my patented wizzbang approach to a successful resolution of your bug within ubuntu!
  
First, let me clarify what a successful resolution is. If you have been around ubuntu, you may have seen a bug that expired as 'incomplete'. This is clearly not a successful resolution. In my eyes, a successful resolution to a bug sees the status changed to a 'won't fix, fix committed, triaged, etc'.

Ok, so here's the steps:
  1. If you don’t know how to file a good bug, ask first! It's important to do your best to describe the problem you are experiencing, and if possible how to repeat the bug. Check out the post on askubuntu which has a nice summary of resources available to help you.
  2. File a good bug, using your newly formed knowledge from above :-)
  3. Get someone else to confirm it. This is important! If possible, have a friend confirm the bug on their system. Once they've confirmed it, have them mark the bug as affecting them as well on launchpad.
  4. Answer questions promptly when asked by others. Make sure you are getting emails from launchpad, and when someone asks a question on your bug, respond promptly.
  5. Get your bug triaged. If your bug is confirmed and filed correctly, the bug triagers should help triage the bug. If a long time has passed without this occurring, check to make sure you bug is in good order to be triaged. If so, asking politely for a triager to look at your bug on the #ubuntu-bugs channel is a good way to keep your bug moving.
  6. Help debug, test, and confirm and fixes that are made for your issue. If the developer spends time working on your bug, do what you can to help confirm it fixes your issue.
  7. Remember no one will care about your bug as much as you do! When you file a bug, commit to carrying it as far along in the process as you can.
That's it! There's no guarantee every bug you file now will receive your desired outcome, but you should see proper resolution, instead of your bugs expiring. By being a good participant you are ensuring you can feel good about the resolution of the bugs you file. Remember we are all human, and sometimes things get missed. Stick with your bug, and shepherd it through.

So is the process perfect? Not at all. We as a community still need to think more about improving our experience in dealing with problems. Not every "problem" encountered is a bug, and a process to better handle these problems is still worthy of thought. I invite those of you interested in this to look for a UDS session on the topic.

Special thanks to TheLordofTime and hggdh for their discussions surrounding bugs, and of course for our marvelous bugsquad without whom this would not be possible!

Nicholas Skaggs

Global Jam with QA love

Global Jam is a unique time for folks to get together across the world and celebrate ubuntu. As part of the celebrations, there is an opportunity to download the latest beta (released yesterday!) and check out the next version of ubuntu. You can run it in a livecd or perhaps in a virtual machine. Ether way, there's opportunities for you to test the common applications and report your results.

The testcases are available here: Ubuntu Global Jam Testcases. For some of you, this page may seem a bit funny, but fortunately there is a handy walk-through for you to understand how to use the tracker and specifically, how to report results against these tests. Check out the guides below. If you follow the link, you'll even find some video of yours truly giving you a visual demonstration.

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Testing/QATracker
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Testing/CallforTesting/Walkthrough

If you get stuck, remember your friends in #ubuntu-testing on freenode are also happy to help. Have fun jamming, and if you do test, Happy Testing! Most of all, celebrate ubuntu!